Monday, June 30, 2008

a logo and a design






We were contracted recently to print 1500 t-shirts to be given away at Old Home Days in celebration of the 30th anniversary of this event that rocks East Hampton CT for three days in July. Old Home Days is a three day carnival, a road race and a giant 2 hour long parade. My family hasn’t missed this event for almost 20 years.
When we won the bid to do the giveaway t-shirts I was looking forward to working on a design with so much first-hand inspiration. In my mind the design for the t-shirt would be an illustration of everything I associated with Old Home Days combined with a crisp type treatment. The above design was the result and it was a direct hit with the committee– with one exception. In the initial design I had neglected to include the runners. Oops. I had run the Glorious Gallop a few times, but apparently the race didn't make it into my bank of fond Old Home Days memories. Can't imagine why.
The committee loved the final t-shirt design and talked about using it as a logo for Old Home Days. While this graphic may have many applications beyond the t-shirt it was designed for, I knew there was way too much detail in this design for it to work as a logo.
We have been printing for various schools and organizations in town for a few years now and have often used the bell graphic that is associated with East Hampton, otherwise known as "Belltown". It’s a straightforward bell, very simple in design and dignified in stature. It’s a symbol that has come to represent our town that in the 1800s was home to 30 bell manufacturers. There was no question that it would be included in any logo designed for Old Home Days.
At the same time, a logo for Old Home Days needed to show the same energy that the event brings to our town every July. Somebody had to make that bell ring. And so, I did. As Sue from the library said, “It's great to see a bell that you don’t feel you have to salute.”
And the last piece to the Old Home Days branding mission- the t-shirt design for the road race. No need to explain where that came from.